Bowling Ball Drilling Layouts and Pin Location

First, this is a bowling tips article on understanding pin location and how it is used in bowling ball layouts.

This is a little more advanced bowling tip for your intermediate to advanced bowler although your beginning bowler may learn something as well.

The tournament bowler in today’s game needs to have a wide variety of bowling equipment and they also need to understand when to use, what type of bowling ball whether it is the right cover stock, type of core or type of bowling ball drilling layout. This is where the pin location comes into play and this is what we are mainly going to focus on in this article.

Pin location and bowling ball drilling layouts.

First of all, what is the pin?

The pin is what they use when they make a bowling ball to hold the core into place as they pour the cover stock material in a mold so that it can dry. After that material dries they will cut this pin off the bowling ball. The pin then shows the ball driller where the center of the top of the core is located on the bowling ball. They use a different color in the pin compared to the bowling bowl color it self.

That is how they determine the position of the weight block in the bowling ball before drilling. This was on a symmetric bowling ball, asymmetric bowling balls will have pin along with a mass bias location.

I’m not getting into too much detail on the difference between asymmetric and symmetric bowling balls. A basic rule of thumb to understand the difference between asymmetric and symmetric cored bowling balls is as follows.

1. An asymmetric bowling ball will typically have a faster change of direction, will rev up faster off the spot. This is measured by the spin time of the asymmetric core design. Basically the higher the number of mass bias strength the faster, earlier and stronger this ball will read the lane. But it can be delayed by the type and texture of cover stock itself.

2. A symmetric bowling ball will typically have a smoother and slower change in direction. These core designs usually are smoother in ball motion than the asymmetric type. Again, by changing the cover stock itself, you can change the length of the slide area of the lane which will affect the response of the bowling ball down lane. This brings us into when the pin and bowling ball drilling layout comes into play.

A basic rule of thumb.

1. The closer the pin is to the track of the ball the more end-over-end reaction along with a longer and stronger reaction down lane.

2. The closer the pin is to the positive axis point of the bowling ball the smoother and earlier the reaction of the bowling ball will tend to be, in other words you will have an even earlier rolling bowling ball with less backend.

3. Putting the pin higher or above your finger holes will also give your ball a later and stronger response.

4. Putting the pin below the finger holes typically will give the ball an earlier and smoother response.

That is mainly just a guideline for the pin location. Adjusting this in different locations can create a wide variety of bowling ball reactions in conjunction with the mass bias location on asymmetric balls and the cover stock itself.


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In conclusion
This was just generalized guideline to follow when thinking about bowling ball drilling layouts.
First, you need to understand what you need in your bowling arsenal.
In other words, do you need more help down lane with a faster response or do you need a smoother, earlier and controlled response to the condition of that lane.
This, along with choosing the type and preparation of the cover stock is a very important key to having a bowling ball drilling layout and cover stock that fits the needs of your game.

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